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INFORMING AND EDUCATING THE PUBLIC ON THE

H I S T O R Y

AND HERITAGE OF PETERSON SPACE FORCE BASE

 

The Edward J. Peterson Air and Space Museum is Colorado’s oldest aviation museum. We preserve and portray the rich aviation and space history of Colorado Springs and Peterson Space Force Base.
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FREE ADMISSION:

PLEASE SEE OUR VISITOR INFORMATION FOR HOURS OF OPERATION

VISITOR INFORMATION
Welcome to the Edward J. Peterson Air and Space Museum, Colorado’s oldest aviation museum! We preserve and portray the rich aviation and space history of Colorado Springs and Peterson Space Force Base. From our barnstormer beginnings in the Roaring Twenties, through the daring exploits of our World War II pilots and into the modern space era, our exhibits are sure to capture your attention.

Awarded Certificate of Excellence 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019

This website is sponsored by the Peterson Air & Space Museum Foundation, which is a non-federal entity.

Neither the United States Air Force nor the Department of Defense express or imply endorsement of the Peterson Air & Space Museum Foundation.


Museum Tour & Aerial Photos

Welcome to the Award Winning Peterson Air and Space Museum, Colorado’s oldest Aviation Museum.

Photo Gallery

Our Photo Gallery contains images of our exhibits and some of the events over the years.

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What Our

Visitors Are Saying

I would like to personally thank you and your staff for arranging a tour of the Peterson Air and Space Museum for the senior leadership of the Marine Corps Judge Advocate community. We were impressed with both your facilities and the tours that we received. Thank you again for your efforts. They truly enhanced our conference. Brig Gen James Walker

U.S. Marine Corps

Our family is very into the annual roadtrips. This time we’ve dedicated a whole summer to driving all the way from New York to the West Coast, visiting numerous different museums along the way, including this one.” Lt Gen Frank Klotz (ret)

Ass’t Vice Chief of Staff, USAF

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Contact Information

150 E. Ent Avenue Peterson SFB CO 80914-1303 staff@petemuseum.org

PASM Facebook Feed

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Space operations, it's a global thing!

🛰🛰🛰Space is the Place! 🛰🛰🛰
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Space operations, its a global thing!

🛰🛰🛰Space is the Place! 🛰🛰🛰Image attachmentImage attachment+2Image attachment

IT'S MISSILE MONDAY! Sharing this missile factoid for our friends in North Dakota.Back to a Missile Fact Monday: The evolution of American ICBM deployment largely took place over the matter of five years, beginning with the first Atlas ICBMs on alert at Vandenberg AFB, California in late 1959 standing on gantry launchers exposed to the elements (albeit with a fantastic view of the Pacific Ocean).

Two further deployments of Atlas-D brought very nominal blast protection with above-ground "coffin" launchers, with a semi-hardened launcher capability found with the horizontally-stored Atlas-E. Titan-Is and Atlas-F introduced "missile silos" to the American landscape, and rounded out the first generation of American ICBMs - all liquid fueled, and all phased out of service by April 1965.

Unlike previous missiles, Titan-IIs and Minuteman were designed to be launched directly from underground silos (instead of being elevated to the surface to fire like Atlas-F and Titan-I). Further, consider the compact size of a Minuteman silo in this image compared to its predecessors (90 foot deep in the Grand Forks field compared to the 174 foot depth of Atlas-F silos). As Minuteman entered service, this very responsive, relatively small, well-protected, and solid-fueled missile revolutionized the Cold War ICBM game. Further improvements followed, and by 1964 silos in the Grand Forks area were further hardened against attack. Sites were capable of launching missiles perhaps weeks after a nuclear attack had disrupted commercial electrical power thanks to emergency generators buried well below ground and encapsulated with reinforced concrete.

(Image: National Park Service)
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ITS MISSILE MONDAY!  Sharing this missile factoid for our friends in North Dakota.

It's FIGHTER FRIDAY! The Peterson Museum has an F-89J on display in the Airpark.This 1955 ad from Link Aviation, Inc. talks about the realistic flight simulators they make supporting the training of pilots in the F-89 "Scorpion" interceptor. ... See MoreSee Less

Its FIGHTER FRIDAY!  The Peterson Museum has an F-89J on display in the Airpark.
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